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Daily Creativity #91 | Flash Contest: Use a Classic Opening Line as a Starting Point

Choose one of these opening lines from classic novels, and use it as the starting point for your own short story.

“There was no possibility of taking a walk that day.” Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte (1847)

"Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again." Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier (1938)

“I write this sitting in the kitchen sink.” I Capture the Castle by Dodie Smith (1949)

Reader Interactions

Comments

  1. Hi,
    Do we use these actual opening lines as the first sentence of our story? Or are they simply a jumping off point to give us ideas for another story? Thanks for the great prompt!

    • Hi Liam – great question! The idea was to use one of those actual opening lines, and then take it wherever you want. Have fun with it!

  2. Hi, when does Stone Soup release the results of the Flash Contests? Have the results of the previous Flash Contest – write about a person waiting for something, but don’t reveal what they’re waiting for until the end – been released? Thank you!

    • I don’t work at Stone Soup, but I believe that the results are put in the Saturday newsletter, so last week’s results will be published this Saturday on the blog. Winners and Honorable Mentions will be notified by Wednesday, which means last week’s winners and Honorable Mentions were notified already. The Saturday newsletter hasn’t been released yet.

      • Thanks Joyce for answering for us, that is absolutely right. Sometimes we run a little behind on sending the results to the competitors. We usually manage Wednesdays, but sometimes we run over into Thursdays for that step – but publication always happens on the blog and in the Newsletter without fail on the Saturday!

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